Category Archives: ico crypto ping

What is the simplest implementation of the blockchain?

implementing a blockchain

Blockchains are one of the most significant technologies to emerge in latest years, with many experts believing they will switch our world in the next two decades as much as the internet has over the last two.

You can this executive guide as a PDF (free registration required).

Albeit it is early in its development, firms pursuing blockchain technology include IBM , Microsoft , Walmart , JPMorgan Pursue, Nasdaq , Foxconn, Visa, and shipping giant Maersk . Venture capitalists have so far poured $1.Five billion into the space, with storied firms such as Andreessen Horowitz, Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers, and Khosla Ventures making bets on startups.

The applications for blockchain technology seem endless. While the very first demonstrable ones are financial — international payments, remittances, complicated financial products — it can also solve problems and create fresh opportunities in healthcare, defense, supply chain management, luxury goods, government, and other industries. In more advanced stages, the technology could give rise to what Gartner calls "the programmable economy," powered by entirely fresh business models that eliminate all kinds of middlemen, machine networks in which devices engage in economic activity, and "brainy assets" in which some form of property such as shares in a company can be traded according to programmable or artificial intelligence-based rules rather than the control of a centralized entity.

Not every blockchain works the same way. For example, they can differ in their consensus mechanisms, which are the rules by which the technology will update the ledger. But broadly, a blockchain is a ledger on which fresh transactions are recorded in blocks, with each block identified by a cryptographic hash of that data. The same hash will always result from that data, but it is unlikely to re-create the data from the hash. Similarly, if even the smallest detail of that transaction data is switched, it will create a frantically different hash, and since the hash of each block is included as a data point in the next block, subsequent blocks would also end up with different hashes. This is what makes the ledger tamper-proof. Eventually, security also comes from the fact that numerous computers called knots store the blockchain, and so to switch the ledger, one would need to build up control of at least fifty percent of the computing power in order to switch the record — a difficult feat especially for a public blockchain such as bitcoin's.

A blockchain in two hundred lines of code

The basic concept of blockchain is fairly elementary: a distributed database that maintains a continuously growing list of ordered records. However, it is effortless to get mixed up as usually when we talk about blockchains we also talk about the problems we are attempting to solve with them. This is the case in the popular blockchain-based projects such as Bitcoin and Ethereum . The term “blockchain” is usually strongly tied to concepts like transactions , brainy contracts or cryptocurrencies .

The very first logical step is to determine the block structure. To keep things as ordinary as possible we include only the most necessary: index, timestamp, data, hash and previous hash.

constructor(index, previousHash, timestamp, data, hash)

What Is a Bitcoin Worth? The Motley Idiot

What Is a Bitcoin Worth?

Bitcoin has existed for less than a decade, but it has achieved amazing popularity across the globe, and its value has risen along with its use. Shortly after its creation in 2009, one could buy the virtual currency for less than a penny per bitcoin. Now, a bitcoin is worth about $1,250, and many believe that the upward trend for bitcoin could proceed indefinitely. Despite there being slew of skepticism about the inherent value of bitcoin, the currency has survived dramatic volatility without losing favor among its core users.

During the very first duo of years of its existence, bitcoin spotted dramatic gains in price. From its penny valuation in 2009, bitcoin rose to $0.Ten by two thousand ten and very first hit the $1 mark in early 2011. That ignited a meaty wave of fresh request for bitcoin, sending the currency up to more than $Ten by mid-2011.

Photo source: Getty Pictures.

Yet at that point, bitcoin showcased its propensity for big ups and downs. Within just a few months, bitcoin prices dropped 80%, penalizing those who had gotten in at the top and were looking for quick gains. Still, those who stuck with bitcoin earned back their losses, with the currency reaching the $Ten mark again in late 2012.

From there, the next wave of interest in bitcoin took the currency to the $100 mark and beyond, climbing to almost $200 by early 2013. The bankruptcy of the Mt. Gox bitcoin exchange shortly took a big toll on prices, cutting bitcoin’s value in half, but before the year was out, the digital currency climbed above $1,000 as market participants increasingly believed that bitcoin would achieve global currency status and prove to be a better alternative to traditional government-issued currency. The frequency of financial crises across the globe during the very first several years of bitcoin’s history certainly helped feed that theory and added to bitcoin’s appeal.

Since then, bitcoin has remained volatile, but not to the same extent as it was earlier in its existence. Prices sank to around $200 in 2015, but the currency picked up steam again more recently. This year, bitcoin regained the $1,000 level and has climbed as high as almost $1,300.

The true measure of bitcoin’s worth

One concern that some have voiced about bitcoin is that the currency has no intrinsic value. Gold coins, by contrast, represent a given weight of an actual commodity with practical applications, and gold investors take convenience in the fact that their bullion is worth something beyond monetary terms. That’s not true of bitcoin, which one receives as a prize for solving sophisticated mathematical problems.

Yet bitcoin advocates note that the same is true of paper currency. It used to be that Federal Reserve notes were tied to the value of gold or silver, but those days are long gone. Just as a dollar bill only has whatever value a buyer and seller assign to it, so too does bitcoin have practical value to the extent that those who make exchanges of the digital currency agree on what it’s worth.

One reason why bitcoin has become more valuable likely has to do with the fact that one can use it more widely now than early in its history. Many major technology and retail companies accept bitcoin in the same way they would older currencies, and petite businesses have leaped on the bitcoin bandwagon as well. Moreover, with relatively low transaction fees for transfers, bitcoin has become a popular way to budge money while avoiding the costly charges that banks and other financial institutions often impose.

Keep an eye on bitcoin

Bitcoin has seen dramatic price increases recently, but the one thing investors in the currency can be certain of is that volatility in both directions will proceed. With some calling for continued exponential growth in the value of bitcoin while others believe it’s a bubble waiting to burst, the market for bitcoin is sure to be arousing for the foreseeable future.

What Is a Bitcoin Worth? The Motley Loser

What Is a Bitcoin Worth?

Bitcoin has existed for less than a decade, but it has achieved amazing popularity across the globe, and its value has risen along with its use. Shortly after its creation in 2009, one could buy the virtual currency for less than a penny per bitcoin. Now, a bitcoin is worth about $1,250, and many believe that the upward trend for bitcoin could proceed indefinitely. Despite there being slew of skepticism about the inherent value of bitcoin, the currency has survived dramatic volatility without losing favor among its core users.

During the very first duo of years of its existence, bitcoin spotted dramatic gains in price. From its penny valuation in 2009, bitcoin rose to $0.Ten by two thousand ten and very first hit the $1 mark in early 2011. That ignited a hefty wave of fresh request for bitcoin, sending the currency up to more than $Ten by mid-2011.

Photo source: Getty Pictures.

Yet at that point, bitcoin displayed its propensity for big ups and downs. Within just a few months, bitcoin prices dropped 80%, penalizing those who had gotten in at the top and were looking for quick gains. Still, those who stuck with bitcoin earned back their losses, with the currency reaching the $Ten mark again in late 2012.

From there, the next wave of interest in bitcoin took the currency to the $100 mark and beyond, climbing to almost $200 by early 2013. The bankruptcy of the Mt. Gox bitcoin exchange shortly took a big toll on prices, cutting bitcoin’s value in half, but before the year was out, the digital currency climbed above $1,000 as market participants increasingly believed that bitcoin would achieve global currency status and prove to be a better alternative to traditional government-issued currency. The frequency of financial crises across the globe during the very first several years of bitcoin’s history certainly helped feed that theory and added to bitcoin’s appeal.

Since then, bitcoin has remained volatile, but not to the same extent as it was earlier in its existence. Prices sank to around $200 in 2015, but the currency picked up steam again more recently. This year, bitcoin regained the $1,000 level and has climbed as high as almost $1,300.

The true measure of bitcoin’s worth

One concern that some have voiced about bitcoin is that the currency has no intrinsic value. Gold coins, by contrast, represent a given weight of an actual commodity with practical applications, and gold investors take convenience in the fact that their bullion is worth something beyond monetary terms. That’s not true of bitcoin, which one receives as a prize for solving sophisticated mathematical problems.

Yet bitcoin advocates note that the same is true of paper currency. It used to be that Federal Reserve notes were tied to the value of gold or silver, but those days are long gone. Just as a dollar bill only has whatever value a buyer and seller assign to it, so too does bitcoin have practical value to the extent that those who make exchanges of the digital currency agree on what it’s worth.

One reason why bitcoin has become more valuable likely has to do with the fact that one can use it more widely now than early in its history. Many major technology and retail companies accept bitcoin in the same way they would older currencies, and petite businesses have hopped on the bitcoin bandwagon as well. Moreover, with relatively low transaction fees for transfers, bitcoin has become a popular way to budge money while avoiding the costly charges that banks and other financial institutions often impose.

Keep an eye on bitcoin

Bitcoin has seen dramatic price increases recently, but the one thing investors in the currency can be certain of is that volatility in both directions will proceed. With some calling for continued exponential growth in the value of bitcoin while others believe it’s a bubble waiting to burst, the market for bitcoin is sure to be titillating for the foreseeable future.

Related video:

What can an attacker with 51% of hash power do? Bitcoin Stack Exchange

blockchain fifty one attack

Actually, it’s very effortless to do harm to the network once you have 51%; just build your own chain quicker than the network, and broadcast it whenever you like. If you send some of your coins to a fresh address in your own chain, all the transactions issued in the live network by spending those same coins will be reversed at the moment the longer chain is broadcast.

Right from the bitcoin wiki (most likely proof-read by many pairs of eyes) :

An attacker that controls more than 50% of the network’s computing power can, for the time that he is in control, exclude and modify the ordering of transactions. This permits him to:

  • Switch roles transactions that he sends while he’s in control
  • Prevent some or all transactions from gaining any confirmations
  • Prevent some or all other generators from getting any generations

The attacker can’t:

  • Switch sides other people’s transactions
  • Prevent transactions from being sent at all (they’ll demonstrate as 0/unconfirmed)
  • Switch the number of coins generated per block
  • Create coins out of skinny air
  • Send coins that never belonged to him

It’s much more difficult to switch historical blocks, and it becomes exponentially more difficult the further back you go. As above, switching historical blocks only permits you to exclude and switch the ordering of transactions. It’s unlikely to switch blocks created before the last checkpoint.

Since this attack doesn’t permit all that much power over the network, it is expected that no one will attempt it. A profit-seeking person will always build up more by just following the rules, and even someone attempting to ruin the system will very likely find other attacks more attractive. However, if this attack is successfully executed, it will be difficult or unlikely to “untangle” the mess created — any switches the attacker makes might become permanent.

In theory, this attacker possesses enough computing power that they could execute a “dual spend” attack. They could spend coins in one place, permit the coins to come in the block chain as normal until the required confirmations are met, then fire up their 51% of the miners to craft a fraudulent fork of the block chain in which those coins were never spent, permitting them to re-spend the coins. This could theoretically be repeated for as long as the attacker maintained control of 51% or more of the hashrate.

Realistically, 51% is only the point at which this becomes possible not the point at which it becomes likely or effortless. An attacker would very likely need something like 65% to actually execute such an attack.

And then there is the denial of service possibility of abruptly withdrawing from the service, taking the necessary computing resources away to proceed to solve blocks every ten minutes until the difficulty is adjusted down again (which could take a long time if there is only a block every day for example).

Of course, for that one would need much more than 51% of hash power.

The answers so far concentrate on the algorithm itself, I have a few social economic thoughts to add.

Let’s assume Bitcoin is massively popular and indeed becomes THE global go-to currency, at this point this and similar questions become (very) relevant.

What happens in maturing industries is that through commoditization and mergers smaller and smaller numbers of players remain. Through scale advantages this puny number of players will be able to provide services at lower cost and squeeze out smaller players. I see little reason the industry of Bitcoin transaction processing will be exempt from this general rule.

Next, we cannot foresee every aspect of the future, even tho’ the Bitcoin designers did a terrific job there will be situations that will call for switches to the system. For example there might be a call from the people to stop child porn networks, to stop capital shelters for the rich, to stop overly profitable and powerful corporations. etcetera, you name it. Whether justified or not, the people will request for switches, not necessarily a villain government individual, the people.

Since there is only a puny number of players it is actually possible to regulate the industry. For example the regulation could be that only payments with a traceable account number will be processed, or only payments with fastened fees that include a portion for tax.

I would think the government could even request switches to the core of the algorithm. Preventing, for example, “non-certified” players to inject, thereby further establishing the power of the existing payment processors.

The freshly elected monopolists will then, in the final phase of capitalism self-destruction leisurely but steadily raise their processing prices, eventually driving customers away and causing the Bitcoin to never reach the deflationary status many proponents and early investors claim it will have.

And let’s just hope it completes this way, a forking screenplay from this could be that the Bitcoin reaches “too big to fail” status, and the people request further regulation (of processing fees, mining speed caps, etc). We will all keep paying a premium on the existence of the currency, just for the sake of stability and the fear for disruption of the status quo. Just like with today’s currencies.

I’m not attempting to be skeptical, I’m actually very hopeful the crypto currencies are going to help with globalization and advance humanity. As a deflationary currency to “lightly” save for your (early) retirement I am not so sure. As a transaction system most likely in some way.

Maybe we don’t actually need a “currency” maybe all we need is a transaction. Maybe there can be a super layer on top of numerous challenging crypto currencies that quickly and automatically switches your money back and forward inbetween the best suitable mix of currencies and investment funds. After all what you truly care about is how your salary is exchanged into goods and future promises.

What can an attacker with 51% of hash power do? Bitcoin Stack Exchange

blockchain fifty one percent

Actually, it’s very effortless to do harm to the network once you have 51%; just build your own chain swifter than the network, and broadcast it whenever you like. If you send some of your coins to a fresh address in your own chain, all the transactions issued in the live network by spending those same coins will be reversed at the moment the longer chain is broadcast.

Right from the bitcoin wiki (very likely proof-read by many pairs of eyes) :

An attacker that controls more than 50% of the network’s computing power can, for the time that he is in control, exclude and modify the ordering of transactions. This permits him to:

  • Switch sides transactions that he sends while he’s in control
  • Prevent some or all transactions from gaining any confirmations
  • Prevent some or all other generators from getting any generations

The attacker can’t:

  • Switch roles other people’s transactions
  • Prevent transactions from being sent at all (they’ll showcase as 0/unconfirmed)
  • Switch the number of coins generated per block
  • Create coins out of skinny air
  • Send coins that never belonged to him

It’s much more difficult to switch historical blocks, and it becomes exponentially more difficult the further back you go. As above, switching historical blocks only permits you to exclude and switch the ordering of transactions. It’s unlikely to switch blocks created before the last checkpoint.

Since this attack doesn’t permit all that much power over the network, it is expected that no one will attempt it. A profit-seeking person will always build up more by just following the rules, and even someone attempting to ruin the system will most likely find other attacks more attractive. However, if this attack is successfully executed, it will be difficult or unlikely to “untangle” the mess created — any switches the attacker makes might become permanent.

In theory, this attacker wields enough computing power that they could execute a “dual spend” attack. They could spend coins in one place, permit the coins to come in the block chain as normal until the required confirmations are met, then fire up their 51% of the miners to craft a fraudulent fork of the block chain in which those coins were never spent, permitting them to re-spend the coins. This could theoretically be repeated for as long as the attacker maintained control of 51% or more of the hashrate.

Realistically, 51% is only the point at which this becomes possible not the point at which it becomes likely or effortless. An attacker would most likely need something like 65% to actually execute such an attack.

And then there is the denial of service possibility of abruptly withdrawing from the service, taking the necessary computing resources away to proceed to solve blocks every ten minutes until the difficulty is adjusted down again (which could take a long time if there is only a block every day for example).

Of course, for that one would need much more than 51% of hash power.

The answers so far concentrate on the algorithm itself, I have a few social economic thoughts to add.

Let’s assume Bitcoin is massively popular and indeed becomes THE global go-to currency, at this point this and similar questions become (very) relevant.

What happens in maturing industries is that through commoditization and mergers smaller and smaller numbers of players remain. Through scale advantages this puny number of players will be able to provide services at lower cost and squeeze out smaller players. I see little reason the industry of Bitcoin transaction processing will be exempt from this general rule.

Next, we cannot foresee every aspect of the future, even tho’ the Bitcoin designers did a terrific job there will be situations that will call for switches to the system. For example there might be a call from the people to stop child porn networks, to stop capital shelters for the rich, to stop overly profitable and powerful corporations. etcetera, you name it. Whether justified or not, the people will request for switches, not necessarily a villain government individual, the people.

Since there is only a petite number of players it is actually possible to regulate the industry. For example the regulation could be that only payments with a traceable account number will be processed, or only payments with fastened fees that include a portion for tax.

I would think the government could even request switches to the core of the algorithm. Preventing, for example, “non-certified” players to come in, thereby further establishing the power of the existing payment processors.

The freshly elected monopolists will then, in the final phase of capitalism self-destruction leisurely but steadily raise their processing prices, eventually driving customers away and causing the Bitcoin to never reach the deflationary status many proponents and early investors claim it will have.

And let’s just hope it completes this way, a forking screenplay from this could be that the Bitcoin reaches “too big to fail” status, and the people request further regulation (of processing fees, mining speed caps, etc). We will all keep paying a premium on the existence of the currency, just for the sake of stability and the fear for disruption of the status quo. Just like with today’s currencies.

I’m not attempting to be skeptical, I’m actually very hopeful the crypto currencies are going to help with globalization and advance humanity. As a deflationary currency to “lightly” save for your (early) retirement I am not so sure. As a transaction system very likely in some way.

Maybe we don’t actually need a “currency” maybe all we need is a transaction. Maybe there can be a super layer on top of numerous challenging crypto currencies that quickly and automatically switches your money back and forward inbetween the best suitable mix of currencies and investment funds. After all what you truly care about is how your salary is exchanged into goods and future promises.

What can an attacker with 51% of hash power do? Bitcoin Stack Exchange

blockchain fifty one percent attack

Actually, it’s very effortless to do harm to the network once you have 51%; just build your own chain quicker than the network, and broadcast it whenever you like. If you send some of your coins to a fresh address in your own chain, all the transactions issued in the live network by spending those same coins will be reversed at the moment the longer chain is broadcast.

Right from the bitcoin wiki (most likely proof-read by many pairs of eyes) :

An attacker that controls more than 50% of the network’s computing power can, for the time that he is in control, exclude and modify the ordering of transactions. This permits him to:

  • Switch sides transactions that he sends while he’s in control
  • Prevent some or all transactions from gaining any confirmations
  • Prevent some or all other generators from getting any generations

The attacker can’t:

  • Switch roles other people’s transactions
  • Prevent transactions from being sent at all (they’ll demonstrate as 0/unconfirmed)
  • Switch the number of coins generated per block
  • Create coins out of skinny air
  • Send coins that never belonged to him

It’s much more difficult to switch historical blocks, and it becomes exponentially more difficult the further back you go. As above, switching historical blocks only permits you to exclude and switch the ordering of transactions. It’s unlikely to switch blocks created before the last checkpoint.

Since this attack doesn’t permit all that much power over the network, it is expected that no one will attempt it. A profit-seeking person will always build up more by just following the rules, and even someone attempting to demolish the system will most likely find other attacks more attractive. However, if this attack is successfully executed, it will be difficult or unlikely to “untangle” the mess created — any switches the attacker makes might become permanent.

In theory, this attacker possesses enough computing power that they could execute a “dual spend” attack. They could spend coins in one place, permit the coins to inject the block chain as normal until the required confirmations are met, then fire up their 51% of the miners to craft a fraudulent fork of the block chain in which those coins were never spent, permitting them to re-spend the coins. This could theoretically be repeated for as long as the attacker maintained control of 51% or more of the hashrate.

Realistically, 51% is only the point at which this becomes possible not the point at which it becomes likely or effortless. An attacker would most likely need something like 65% to actually execute such an attack.

And then there is the denial of service possibility of all of a sudden withdrawing from the service, taking the necessary computing resources away to proceed to solve blocks every ten minutes until the difficulty is adjusted down again (which could take a long time if there is only a block every day for example).

Of course, for that one would need much more than 51% of hash power.

The answers so far concentrate on the algorithm itself, I have a few social economic thoughts to add.

Let’s assume Bitcoin is massively popular and indeed becomes THE global go-to currency, at this point this and similar questions become (very) relevant.

What happens in maturing industries is that through commoditization and mergers smaller and smaller numbers of players remain. Through scale advantages this puny number of players will be able to provide services at lower cost and squeeze out smaller players. I see little reason the industry of Bitcoin transaction processing will be exempt from this general rule.

Next, we cannot foresee every aspect of the future, even tho’ the Bitcoin designers did a terrific job there will be situations that will call for switches to the system. For example there might be a call from the people to stop child porn networks, to stop capital shelters for the rich, to stop overly profitable and powerful corporations. etcetera, you name it. Whether justified or not, the people will request for switches, not necessarily a villain government individual, the people.

Since there is only a puny number of players it is actually possible to regulate the industry. For example the regulation could be that only payments with a traceable account number will be processed, or only payments with affixed fees that include a portion for tax.

I would think the government could even request switches to the core of the algorithm. Preventing, for example, “non-certified” players to inject, thereby further establishing the power of the existing payment processors.

The freshly elected monopolists will then, in the final phase of capitalism self-destruction leisurely but steadily raise their processing prices, eventually driving customers away and causing the Bitcoin to never reach the deflationary status many proponents and early investors claim it will have.

And let’s just hope it completes this way, a forking script from this could be that the Bitcoin reaches “too big to fail” status, and the people request further regulation (of processing fees, mining speed caps, etc). We will all keep paying a premium on the existence of the currency, just for the sake of stability and the fear for disruption of the status quo. Just like with today’s currencies.

I’m not attempting to be skeptical, I’m actually very hopeful the crypto currencies are going to help with globalization and advance humanity. As a deflationary currency to “lightly” save for your (early) retirement I am not so sure. As a transaction system very likely in some way.

Maybe we don’t actually need a “currency” maybe all we need is a transaction. Maybe there can be a super layer on top of numerous contesting crypto currencies that quickly and automatically switches your money back and forward inbetween the best suitable mix of currencies and investment funds. After all what you indeed care about is how your salary is exchanged into goods and future promises.

Related video:

Top ten Blockchain Conferences of two thousand seventeen – Disruptor Daily

Top ten Blockchain Conferences of 2017

Blockchain is the peer-to-peer technology behind major cryptocurrencies like bitcoin and ethereum (eth). However, the distributed ledger concept is applicable to a diverse industries from gaming to healthcare to energy and beyond, even if it is most widely known for its applications in the FinTech niche. Because of its resilient nature, blockchain can create an environment that wards against fraud in terms of both money and information. One intriguing user of blockchain is in regards to copyright for photographers as well as other artists and creators.

There’s even a decentralized application that lets you proclaim your love for someone in a way that always remains on the blockchain and a blockchain-based link shortener.

What other uses are there for blockchain? Speakers and attendees at these ten blockchain conferences in two thousand seventeen are sure to be overflowing with ideas.

Feb. 21-22 in Bucharest, Romania

One-day pass – 70EUR

Total pass – 210EUR

VIP with castle tour – 340EUR

Host a discussion – 1000EUR

d10e is a conference which centers on the potential benefits of establishing decentralization as a core facet of networking. Some very prominent names in computing are speaking at d10e— John McAfee, Bruce Pon, and Yanislav Malahov. d10e is helping thought-leaders come together and incubate their ideas in a space with their peers. The three hundred forty Euro ticket features a five hour long tour of Bucharest, Romania as well as a tour of both Ceres Castle and Dracula’s Castle.

APAC Blockchain Conference two thousand seventeen

Mar. 7-9 in Sydney, AUS

embarking at Three,595AUD

Startups can attend kicking off at 1,459AUD

Discounts available for group purchases

The two thousand seventeen APAC Blockchain Conference in Sydney will be featuring speakers from IBM, ConsenSys, and many other big names in the blockchain space. The event has introduced a strong concentrate on problem solving, collaboration, and identifying commercial uses for blockchain tech.

Georgetown University’s DC Blockchain Summit two thousand seventeen

Mar. 15-16 in Washington D.C.

Ranges from $299 to $1,500

$30 for government employees

Georgetown University’s Blockchain Summit brings some of the most cutting-edge minds behind both the technology and the parties leading regulatory advancement on blockchain technology. Notable attendees are the co-chairs of the Blockchain Caucus and the co-author of “Blockchain Revolution”. Featuring a keynote speech by Don Tapscott, this summit is sure to bring even more public concentrate to the blockchain sector.

The Healthcare Blockchain Summit two thousand seventeen

Mar. 20-21 in Washington D.C.

$695 for healthcare providers and industry

$1095 for all others including finance community

The two thousand seventeen Healthcare Blockchain Conference in Washington D.C. is scheduled to cover a broad array of subject matter regarding the crossover including collaboration within the blockchain industry via some cooperative efforts from projects such as HyperLedger, switches that blockchain can make within the Pharma sector, the role of the Internet of Things and blockchain in healthcare, patient information protection, and more. Their speakers include the Executive Director of the HyperLedger Project and the blockchain product leader for IBM. There is a workshop taking place after the conference with open registration for $300.

CoinFestUK

Apr. 7th-8th in Manchester, UK

Tickets are not yet available

CoinFestUK will feature a speech by Digital Catapult, a talk on Bitcoin and UK law, physical bitcoin assets, and even a live demonstration of a fresh game. Digital Catapult has received funding from the UK’s Minister of State for Digital and Culture in order to ensure that the UK stays a top digital economy. The name of the game is Beyond the Void. They ran a successful crowdfunding campaign via an ICO for their own ETH-based cryptocurrency. Beyond the Void will feature assets that can be traded on cryptocurrency exchanges at a price that the players determine.

BlokTex

Apr. 7-9 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Early bird ticket- $200

BlokTex seeks to bring a disruptive edge in blockchain to South-East Asia. BlokTex will begin on April 7th and end on the 9th, but they feature a pre-event meeting with the author of “The Internet of Money” and “Mastering Blockchain”, Andreas Antonopoulos. A Bitcoin Foundation representative will also be attending the event.

Internet of Things World

May 16-18 in Santa Clara, CA

Embarking at $895

Diminished price if booked before April 21, 2017

Press can apply for free passes here.

Internet of Things World is a gathering of some of the most advanced minds in developing IoT devices. This year, Internet of Things World is going to feature concepts such as blockchain, healthcare, autonomous vehicles, and cybersecurity. Blockchain360 will be speaking on several topics, including the potential benefits of incorporating IoT devices into a blockchain environment. There are expected to be almost 11,000 visitors to Internet of Things World this year and as many as four hundred speakers.

Consensus two thousand seventeen

May 22-24 in Fresh York, NY

Students (undergrad/graduate school—non Ph.D) $250

Academia, Government, Military $499

Fresh Startups (less than 24mo. old & less than 1M in funding) $699

Startups $1,099-$1,399 Before February twenty eight or $Two,099-$Two,399 after February 28

Consensus is a blockchain conference hosted by CoinDesk to foster growth and cooperation among the various parts of the blockchain community. CoinDesk has been hosting Consensus since 2014. Two thousand sixteen was a strong event for them. They sold out of tickets and had attendants from both the government and private sectors of blockchain technology. Consensus also encourages academics, undergraduates, government, and military members alike to attend with a diminished entrance fee. Consensus is expecting more than Two,000 visitors and over eight hundred companies to attend this year.

CoinsBank Blockchain Conference Cruise

May 25-Jun. Three departing from and returning to Cape Liberty, NJ

Ranges from $1495 to $20,000+

CoinsBank is following up on their very successful two thousand sixteen Conference in Turkey with a Conference on the open seas. A cruise—what better way to foster an pleasurable professional atmosphere? The cruise is slated to depart on May 25, two thousand seventeen for a 9-day span of conferences and meetings interwoven with some luxury entertainment. They haven’t announced their speakers yet, but last year’s party featured IBM and several other notable names in blockchain.

BlockOn

Jul. Twenty seven District 1, Singapore

Research presentation and Proposal contests are open until Mar. 31

BlockOn harbors a competitive and supportive atmosphere to help with switching and influencing regulation on blockchain technology. BlockOn is partnered with a number of prominent names in the blockchain community such as Blockchain Angels. BlockOn is a one-day conference with research and proposal competitions, as well as several startup presentation slots in their schedule. You can contact them via their website if you would like to attend.

Top ten Blockchain Conferences of two thousand seventeen – Disruptor Daily

Top ten Blockchain Conferences of 2017

Blockchain is the peer-to-peer technology behind major cryptocurrencies like bitcoin and ethereum (eth). However, the distributed ledger concept is applicable to a diverse industries from gaming to healthcare to energy and beyond, even if it is most widely known for its applications in the FinTech niche. Because of its resilient nature, blockchain can create an environment that wards against fraud in terms of both money and information. One intriguing user of blockchain is in regards to copyright for photographers as well as other artists and creators.

There’s even a decentralized application that lets you proclaim your love for someone in a way that always remains on the blockchain and a blockchain-based link shortener.

What other uses are there for blockchain? Speakers and attendees at these ten blockchain conferences in two thousand seventeen are sure to be overflowing with ideas.

Feb. 21-22 in Bucharest, Romania

One-day pass – 70EUR

Total pass – 210EUR

VIP with castle tour – 340EUR

Host a discussion – 1000EUR

d10e is a conference which centers on the potential benefits of establishing decentralization as a core facet of networking. Some very prominent names in computing are speaking at d10e— John McAfee, Bruce Pon, and Yanislav Malahov. d10e is helping thought-leaders come together and incubate their ideas in a space with their peers. The three hundred forty Euro ticket features a five hour long tour of Bucharest, Romania as well as a tour of both Ceres Castle and Dracula’s Castle.

APAC Blockchain Conference two thousand seventeen

Mar. 7-9 in Sydney, AUS

kicking off at Trio,595AUD

Startups can attend kicking off at 1,459AUD

Discounts available for group purchases

The two thousand seventeen APAC Blockchain Conference in Sydney will be featuring speakers from IBM, ConsenSys, and many other big names in the blockchain space. The event has introduced a strong concentrate on problem solving, collaboration, and identifying commercial uses for blockchain tech.

Georgetown University’s DC Blockchain Summit two thousand seventeen

Mar. 15-16 in Washington D.C.

Ranges from $299 to $1,500

$30 for government employees

Georgetown University’s Blockchain Summit brings some of the most cutting-edge minds behind both the technology and the parties leading regulatory advancement on blockchain technology. Notable attendees are the co-chairs of the Blockchain Caucus and the co-author of “Blockchain Revolution”. Featuring a keynote speech by Don Tapscott, this summit is sure to bring even more public concentrate to the blockchain sector.

The Healthcare Blockchain Summit two thousand seventeen

Mar. 20-21 in Washington D.C.

$695 for healthcare providers and industry

$1095 for all others including finance community

The two thousand seventeen Healthcare Blockchain Conference in Washington D.C. is scheduled to cover a broad array of subject matter regarding the crossover including collaboration within the blockchain industry via some cooperative efforts from projects such as HyperLedger, switches that blockchain can make within the Pharma sector, the role of the Internet of Things and blockchain in healthcare, patient information protection, and more. Their speakers include the Executive Director of the HyperLedger Project and the blockchain product leader for IBM. There is a workshop taking place after the conference with open registration for $300.

CoinFestUK

Apr. 7th-8th in Manchester, UK

Tickets are not yet available

CoinFestUK will feature a speech by Digital Catapult, a talk on Bitcoin and UK law, physical bitcoin assets, and even a live demonstration of a fresh game. Digital Catapult has received funding from the UK’s Minister of State for Digital and Culture in order to ensure that the UK stays a top digital economy. The name of the game is Beyond the Void. They ran a successful crowdfunding campaign via an ICO for their own ETH-based cryptocurrency. Beyond the Void will feature assets that can be traded on cryptocurrency exchanges at a price that the players determine.

BlokTex

Apr. 7-9 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Early bird ticket- $200

BlokTex seeks to bring a disruptive edge in blockchain to South-East Asia. BlokTex will begin on April 7th and end on the 9th, but they feature a pre-event meeting with the author of “The Internet of Money” and “Mastering Blockchain”, Andreas Antonopoulos. A Bitcoin Foundation representative will also be attending the event.

Internet of Things World

May 16-18 in Santa Clara, CA

Beginning at $895

Diminished price if booked before April 21, 2017

Press can apply for free passes here.

Internet of Things World is a gathering of some of the most advanced minds in developing IoT devices. This year, Internet of Things World is going to feature concepts such as blockchain, healthcare, autonomous vehicles, and cybersecurity. Blockchain360 will be speaking on several topics, including the potential benefits of incorporating IoT devices into a blockchain environment. There are expected to be almost 11,000 visitors to Internet of Things World this year and as many as four hundred speakers.

Consensus two thousand seventeen

May 22-24 in Fresh York, NY

Students (undergrad/graduate school—non Ph.D) $250

Academia, Government, Military $499

Fresh Startups (less than 24mo. old & less than 1M in funding) $699

Startups $1,099-$1,399 Before February twenty eight or $Two,099-$Two,399 after February 28

Consensus is a blockchain conference hosted by CoinDesk to foster growth and cooperation among the various parts of the blockchain community. CoinDesk has been hosting Consensus since 2014. Two thousand sixteen was a strong event for them. They sold out of tickets and had attendants from both the government and private sectors of blockchain technology. Consensus also encourages academics, undergraduates, government, and military members alike to attend with a diminished entrance fee. Consensus is expecting more than Two,000 visitors and over eight hundred companies to attend this year.

CoinsBank Blockchain Conference Cruise

May 25-Jun. Three departing from and returning to Cape Liberty, NJ

Ranges from $1495 to $20,000+

CoinsBank is following up on their very successful two thousand sixteen Conference in Turkey with a Conference on the open seas. A cruise—what better way to foster an pleasant professional atmosphere? The cruise is slated to depart on May 25, two thousand seventeen for a 9-day span of conferences and meetings interwoven with some luxury entertainment. They haven’t announced their speakers yet, but last year’s party featured IBM and several other notable names in blockchain.

BlockOn

Jul. Twenty seven District 1, Singapore

Research presentation and Proposal contests are open until Mar. 31

BlockOn harbors a competitive and supportive atmosphere to help with switching and influencing regulation on blockchain technology. BlockOn is partnered with a number of prominent names in the blockchain community such as Blockchain Angels. BlockOn is a one-day conference with research and proposal competitions, as well as several startup presentation slots in their schedule. You can contact them via their website if you would like to attend.

Top ten Blockchain Conferences of two thousand seventeen – Disruptor Daily

Top ten Blockchain Conferences of 2017

Blockchain is the peer-to-peer technology behind major cryptocurrencies like bitcoin and ethereum (eth). However, the distributed ledger concept is applicable to a diverse industries from gaming to healthcare to energy and beyond, even if it is most widely known for its applications in the FinTech niche. Because of its resilient nature, blockchain can create an environment that wards against fraud in terms of both money and information. One intriguing user of blockchain is in regards to copyright for photographers as well as other artists and creators.

There’s even a decentralized application that lets you proclaim your love for someone in a way that always remains on the blockchain and a blockchain-based link shortener.

What other uses are there for blockchain? Speakers and attendees at these ten blockchain conferences in two thousand seventeen are sure to be overflowing with ideas.

Feb. 21-22 in Bucharest, Romania

One-day pass – 70EUR

Total pass – 210EUR

VIP with castle tour – 340EUR

Host a discussion – 1000EUR

d10e is a conference which centers on the potential benefits of establishing decentralization as a core facet of networking. Some very prominent names in computing are speaking at d10e— John McAfee, Bruce Pon, and Yanislav Malahov. d10e is helping thought-leaders come together and incubate their ideas in a space with their peers. The three hundred forty Euro ticket features a five hour long tour of Bucharest, Romania as well as a tour of both Ceres Castle and Dracula’s Castle.

APAC Blockchain Conference two thousand seventeen

Mar. 7-9 in Sydney, AUS

beginning at Trio,595AUD

Startups can attend embarking at 1,459AUD

Discounts available for group purchases

The two thousand seventeen APAC Blockchain Conference in Sydney will be featuring speakers from IBM, ConsenSys, and many other big names in the blockchain space. The event has introduced a strong concentrate on problem solving, collaboration, and identifying commercial uses for blockchain tech.

Georgetown University’s DC Blockchain Summit two thousand seventeen

Mar. 15-16 in Washington D.C.

Ranges from $299 to $1,500

$30 for government employees

Georgetown University’s Blockchain Summit brings some of the most cutting-edge minds behind both the technology and the parties leading regulatory advancement on blockchain technology. Notable attendees are the co-chairs of the Blockchain Caucus and the co-author of “Blockchain Revolution”. Featuring a keynote speech by Don Tapscott, this summit is sure to bring even more public concentrate to the blockchain sector.

The Healthcare Blockchain Summit two thousand seventeen

Mar. 20-21 in Washington D.C.

$695 for healthcare providers and industry

$1095 for all others including finance community

The two thousand seventeen Healthcare Blockchain Conference in Washington D.C. is scheduled to cover a broad array of subject matter regarding the crossover including collaboration within the blockchain industry via some cooperative efforts from projects such as HyperLedger, switches that blockchain can make within the Pharma sector, the role of the Internet of Things and blockchain in healthcare, patient information protection, and more. Their speakers include the Executive Director of the HyperLedger Project and the blockchain product leader for IBM. There is a workshop taking place after the conference with open registration for $300.

CoinFestUK

Apr. 7th-8th in Manchester, UK

Tickets are not yet available

CoinFestUK will feature a speech by Digital Catapult, a talk on Bitcoin and UK law, physical bitcoin assets, and even a live demonstration of a fresh game. Digital Catapult has received funding from the UK’s Minister of State for Digital and Culture in order to ensure that the UK stays a top digital economy. The name of the game is Beyond the Void. They ran a successful crowdfunding campaign via an ICO for their own ETH-based cryptocurrency. Beyond the Void will feature assets that can be traded on cryptocurrency exchanges at a price that the players determine.

BlokTex

Apr. 7-9 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Early bird ticket- $200

BlokTex seeks to bring a disruptive edge in blockchain to South-East Asia. BlokTex will begin on April 7th and end on the 9th, but they feature a pre-event meeting with the author of “The Internet of Money” and “Mastering Blockchain”, Andreas Antonopoulos. A Bitcoin Foundation representative will also be attending the event.

Internet of Things World

May 16-18 in Santa Clara, CA

Commencing at $895

Diminished price if booked before April 21, 2017

Press can apply for free passes here.

Internet of Things World is a gathering of some of the most advanced minds in developing IoT devices. This year, Internet of Things World is going to feature concepts such as blockchain, healthcare, autonomous vehicles, and cybersecurity. Blockchain360 will be speaking on several topics, including the potential benefits of incorporating IoT devices into a blockchain environment. There are expected to be almost 11,000 visitors to Internet of Things World this year and as many as four hundred speakers.

Consensus two thousand seventeen

May 22-24 in Fresh York, NY

Students (undergrad/graduate school—non Ph.D) $250

Academia, Government, Military $499

Fresh Startups (less than 24mo. old & less than 1M in funding) $699

Startups $1,099-$1,399 Before February twenty eight or $Two,099-$Two,399 after February 28

Consensus is a blockchain conference hosted by CoinDesk to foster growth and cooperation among the various parts of the blockchain community. CoinDesk has been hosting Consensus since 2014. Two thousand sixteen was a strong event for them. They sold out of tickets and had attendants from both the government and private sectors of blockchain technology. Consensus also encourages academics, undergraduates, government, and military members alike to attend with a diminished entrance fee. Consensus is expecting more than Two,000 visitors and over eight hundred companies to attend this year.

CoinsBank Blockchain Conference Cruise

May 25-Jun. Three departing from and returning to Cape Liberty, NJ

Ranges from $1495 to $20,000+

CoinsBank is following up on their very successful two thousand sixteen Conference in Turkey with a Conference on the open seas. A cruise—what better way to foster an pleasant professional atmosphere? The cruise is slated to depart on May 25, two thousand seventeen for a 9-day span of conferences and meetings interwoven with some luxury entertainment. They haven’t announced their speakers yet, but last year’s party featured IBM and several other notable names in blockchain.

BlockOn

Jul. Twenty seven District 1, Singapore

Research presentation and Proposal contests are open until Mar. 31

BlockOn harbors a competitive and supportive atmosphere to help with switching and influencing regulation on blockchain technology. BlockOn is partnered with a number of prominent names in the blockchain community such as Blockchain Angels. BlockOn is a one-day conference with research and proposal competitions, as well as several startup presentation slots in their schedule. You can contact them via their website if you would like to attend.

Related video:

The World Economic Forum Might Not Be Ready to Lead a Blockchain Revolution

blockchain revolution

The research phase of the World Economic Forum’s work with blockchain has only just begun, and already its managing director is beginning to explore a more hands-on treatment.

So far, the international non-profit comprised of the leaders of more than a thousand of the largest companies in the world, has focused largely on establishing a blockchain working group, last week publishing its very first in-depth white paper on how to maximize the influence of the technology.

But following publication of the paper, WEF managing director Richard Samans acknowledged how much more many of his members still have to learn, in spite of projects being initiated on several other fronts.

Samans told CoinDesk:

“Most of this leader-level community is not very well versed in blockchain. In fact, they may know the term, but they don’t know much about where the technology is right now and how it may be applied in multi-faceted ways via society.”

Ostensibly, the white paper – written by Blockchain Research Institute co-founders, Don and Alex Tapscott – was designed to lay the framework for how existing consortia, private companies and governments could work together to maximize the potential benefits of a collective, trustworthy ledger of transactions.

Still, Samans said that even some of the most senior-level executives among the WEF membership still need to learn more about how such a technology could be employed in ways that benefit society at large.

“There’s a 2nd potential benefit of issuing this white paper, for this particular community,” said Samans. “And that is to raise awareness of blockchain as as reality already, and to give advanced notice that this is worth some real thinking among all sorts of social actors.”

Blockchain match

Key to that learning curve are two main groups within the World Economic Forum.

Very first is the freshly launched Global Future Council on the Future of Blockchain, with membership including Hyperledger executive director Brian Behlendorf, R3 chief technology officer Richard Gendal Brown and Everledger CEO Leanne Kemp.

2nd is the Center for the Fourth Industrial Revolution, launched last October to pursue fresh ways to leverage the mutli-stakeholder treatment across industries. With fucking partners that include Salesforce, Kaiser Permanente, Palantir Technologies and SAP, the center has been studying fresh ways to implement AI, the civilian use of drones, distributed ledger technology and more.

According to Samans, blockchain itself is ideally suited for the multi-stakeholder principals being followed within the center, which he said “could improve the prospects for the technology’s development.”

Whether that actually ever happens, however, is contingent on how quickly the members can catch up on the technology, and whether blockchain developers even want such centralizing oversight, regardless of its intentions.

“We are also a fertile platform for further catalyzing partnerships and in this case, there are a number of potentially fairly interesting use cases of blockchain, which are indeed in the early stages of being explored, whether they have to do with development or the way the economy operates.”

Disclosure: CoinDesk is a subsidiary of Digital Currency Group, which has an ownership stake in Everledger.

World Economic Forum photo via Flickr

The leader in blockchain news, CoinDesk is an independent media outlet that strives for the highest journalistic standards and abides by a stringent set of editorial policies. Interested in suggesting your expertise or insights to our reporting? Contact us at [email protected] .

Related video:

The current state of blockchain regulation, Mobile Payments Today

The current state of blockchain regulation

With fresh technologies, it takes a while for regulation to catch up. Blockchain technology is no exception. While we are leisurely beginning to see standards emerge — for example, Fresh York state’s fresh BitLicense regulations — the reputation of blockchain is still marred by the criminal aspects of bitcoin.

Bitcoin itself recently took a hit when the SEC ruled against the Winklevoss twins’ proposal for an exchange-traded fund for bitcoin. The SEC voiced concern about the capability of powerful, unregulated Chinese exchanges to manipulate the price of bitcoin. This underscores a key aspect of virtual currency regulation: It is still in its infancy.

“The current regulatory landscape when talking about [distributed ledger technologies] is at the same time immature and complicated, and it depends on what component of the DLTs we are talking about: cryptocurrencies; blockchains; collective ledgers; clever contracts; etc.,” Javier Sebastian Cermeno said in a report by BBVA Research. “The regulatory treatment of each of these components is different, albeit [the] lack of specific regulation is a common factor.”

Presently, countries such as Brazil, Canada, the United States and many European nations at least permit bitcoin technologies. Others such as China and India have a less friendly relationship with bitcoin, and some — including Russia — are outright hostile, according to the BBVA report.

Even among governments that do permit trading in bitcoin and other virtual currencies, regulation can be inconsistent. For example, the European Parliament believes it should take a hands-off treatment to virtual currency regulation and should simply analyze it. However, the European Banking Authority, a regulator agency of the EU, recommends that banks stay away from virtual currency.

In the U.S., the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network was the very first government agency to release a statement on virtual currency. FinCEN was followed by the IRS, according to a blog by Liz Prehn, a tax attorney for Moskowitz LLP. The IRS regulations for taxation, however, leave a number of unanswered questions. For example, how should bitcoin mining be treated for tax purposes?

“Is virtual currency that is held by a merchant considered a capital or an ordinary asset?” Prehn wrote. Is it a “commodity” subject to mark-to-market accounting?”

Other questions relate to how virtual currency should be reported and how to determine the exchange rate of virtual currency for tax purposes.

While the IRS views virtual currency as property, other regulatory agencies see it differently. FinCEN treats it as money, whereas the Commodity Futures Trading Commission treats it as a commodity. This has led to difficulties in court cases related to bitcoin in which judges have had to determine exactly how to treat virtual currency, according to the BBVA report.

For example, in 2016, Judge Teresa Pooler of the 11th Judicial Circuit Court of Florida ruled on the case of a man charged with helping two undercover agents launder money with bitcoin. Judge Pooler threw out the case telling that bitcoin is not money, thus the defendant could not be charged with money laundering.

From a global perspective, regulatory initiatives around the broad field of distributed ledger technologies are in their initial stages, Cermeno said.

Most regulatory bods now have working groups and task coerces in place analyzing virtual currencies and DLTs, however, there still is relatively little progress toward enforceable regulation.

In the case of blockchain technology regulation, Cermeno asserts that it doesn’t indeed exist yet. But users of the technology will come up against existing regulations for activities — such as clever contracts — as they migrate to blockchain technology.

“Any wise contract defined on the blockchain will have to serve at least with the regulation on contracts applicable on the correspondent jurisdiction, as exposed in the commercial and trade law,” Cermeno said. “Then, depending on what kinds of financial services are being suggested on the blockchain (payments, lending, investment, etc.), regulation on these services will have to be applied. For example, KYC and AML regulation, capital markets regulation, lending regulation, and so on.”

Related video:

Running a total Bitcoin knot on AWS

Running a total Bitcoin knot on AWS

UPDATE – 10th August 2014: The results are in

The knot stayed stable via July and the free tier benefits ran out before that so the following is the accomplish cost.

The main contributions to this were (incl. VAT @ 20%):

| Data Transfer | | | |:————–|—|—| | $0.120 per GB – up to ten TB / month data transfer out | 135.096 GB | $Nineteen.46 |

| EC2 | | | |:—-|—|—| | $0.020 per On Request Linux t1.micro Example Hour | seven hundred forty four Hrs | $17.86 | | $0.05 per one million I/O requests – US East (Northern Virginia) | 23,715,799 IOs | $1.43 | | $0.05 per GB-month of Magnetic provisioned storage – US East (Northern Virginia) | 48.000 GB-Mo | $Two.88 |

I just want to know how much it will cost to run a utter bitcoin knot on an EC2 example. The two main factors being disk usage (the size of the block chain at the time of writing being around 17GB) and IO (how much traffic I may have to pay for to permit incoming connections on port 8333).

  1. I embark with a t1.micro example running Ubuntu 14.04 (LTS) sixty four bit.
  2. For now I accept the default 8GB root volume and add an extra 40GB EBS volume on which I’ll store the blockchain (Originally I began with 20GB but this did not last long before running out of space and crashing the knot – i’m sure less would suffice for a while but i don’t want to resize the disk again every few days/weeks)
  3. I configure any IP access on port twenty two for SSH (I have to be able to configure my server – albeit I could restrict the IP addresses permitted to connect on this port for added security)
  4. I configure any IP access on port eight thousand three hundred thirty three (I want this to be a useful knot and not a leech! So other knots have to be able to connect)
  5. I create a fresh key pair to access the server using SSH and launch the example!

Next I have to connect and install/configure bitcoind. To simplify things I’ll add a

/.ssh/config file to point to my fresh key and awkward public DNS name

This permits me to connect with a elementary ssh bitcoin-node

So, now to install bitcoind …

And configure it as a service…

Before I commence the bitcoind service I want to configure it to use my EBS volume for the blockchain. The very first step of which is to initialize and climb on the volume. Run the following directive to get the device name

As you can see, in my case I have an unitialized volume at /dev/xvdb ( lsblk strips the /dev/ from the device name). So I use the following directive to initialize an ext4 filesystem

Next, I need to configure this to be mounted on boot. Very first I will create a climb on point

Then we can add the following line to /etc/fstab to climb on the volume on boot in future

Run the following to climb on the volumes listed in /etc/fstab

Now add a bitcoin system user, setting its home directory on the EBS volume

To configure bitcoind we now need to add a config file to /data/bitcoin/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf

Now set the permissions on it

Now we can add an upstart config at /etc/init/bitcoind.conf

Before we can begin the service we need to make sure that the machine does not run out of memory and crash it. This will happen after a fairly brief time. The solution is to add a swapfile.

This creates a 1.5GB (a little over twice the RAM of 0.613GB on a t1.micro example) exchange file and activates it. In order to ensure it is activated on reboot we need to add another entry to /etc/fstab

To ensure that the swapfile is only used when it’s indeed needed we should set the swappiness. This is an optimization of the kernel. A high value (maximum of 100) would tell the kernel to favour the exchange file, we will set a low value of ten to favour RAM when it is available.

These directions set the current swappiness value and set the kernel configuration to the same value on reboot. To finish configuring the swapfile, set its permissions so that it cannot be read by other users.

Only now should we register the service and embark it…

And there we go, the bitcoin knot should be running and downloading the blockchain. I have no intention of actually using it as a wallet but hopefully it will be providing the useful services of a participating total knot. Now let’s see how the costs stack up.

Related video:

R3 Consortium Acknowledges Corda Has No Blockchain Infrastructure

R3 Consortium Acknowledges Corda Has No Blockchain Infrastructure

It is evident mimicking the bitcoin ecosystem can't be done in a workable way.

Across 2016, there has been a lot of hype regarding the R3 blockchain consortium. With backing from some of the world’s largest banks, the future of private blockchains seemed secured. An interesting slide from the R3 Corda presentation tells a very different story, tho’. In fact, R3 is not using a blockchain as they “don’t need one”. A rather unusual statement that raises more questions.

Many people have questioned the viability of R3’s Corda project . Using private blockchains has always been controversial among cryptocurrency enthusiasts. In most cases, private blockchains do not provide immutability as they are managed by a centralized entity. This makes the entire concept a bit odd, as the involved parties could just use a traditional SQL database instead.

R3 concedes defeat: "No Block Chain, because we don't need one" pic.twitter.com/tHE3I6U8mN

One thing that makes blockchains so appealing is how they speed up transactions. For some reason, the R3 consortium feels they no longer need a blockchain in the very first place. That is a very controversial statement, to say the least. The fatter question is what type of technology they use for Corda if it is not a distributed ledger. To some people, this acknowledgment is evidence of how Corda never used a blockchain in the very first place.

Corda Is A Giant Waste of Money

One Twitter user argues private blockchains are even inferior to SQL databases. Even non-developers agree on that point. There is no point in using a distributed ledger if there is no ensure recorded data is tamper-proof. So far, there has been no private distributed ledger able to provide immutability. None of these projects use a proof of work mechanism, which seems to be a must for keeping records safe from harm and tampering.

Keeping in mind how R3 received millions in funding, it emerges all of that money has been a waste. It is unclear what the money is spent on in the very first place, but it certainly isn’t blockchain technology. Telling they “don’t need” a blockchain is ridiculous for a blockchain-oriented project. It is unclear what will happen to R3 next. The entire project can be chalked up as a waste of time and effort, tho’.

Interestingly enough, this news only bodes well for bitcoin and normal blockchain technology. It is evident mimicking the bitcoin ecosystem can’t be done in a workable way. That is not a surprise either, yet some institutions will proceed to give it a attempt. Corda will be JVM based moving forward, which is the same as taking three steps backward. It is a shame to see so much money go to waste due to a project everyone knew would not succeed in the very first place.

R3 Consortium Acknowledges Corda Has No Blockchain Infrastructure

R3 Consortium Acknowledges Corda Has No Blockchain Infrastructure

It is evident mimicking the bitcoin ecosystem can't be done in a workable way.

Across 2016, there has been a lot of hype regarding the R3 blockchain consortium. With backing from some of the world’s largest banks, the future of private blockchains seemed secured. An interesting slide from the R3 Corda presentation tells a very different story, tho’. In fact, R3 is not using a blockchain as they “don’t need one”. A rather unusual statement that raises more questions.

Many people have questioned the viability of R3’s Corda project . Using private blockchains has always been controversial among cryptocurrency enthusiasts. In most cases, private blockchains do not provide immutability as they are managed by a centralized entity. This makes the entire concept a bit odd, as the involved parties could just use a traditional SQL database instead.

R3 concedes defeat: "No Block Chain, because we don't need one" pic.twitter.com/tHE3I6U8mN

One thing that makes blockchains so appealing is how they speed up transactions. For some reason, the R3 consortium feels they no longer need a blockchain in the very first place. That is a very controversial statement, to say the least. The thicker question is what type of technology they use for Corda if it is not a distributed ledger. To some people, this acknowledgment is evidence of how Corda never used a blockchain in the very first place.

Corda Is A Giant Waste of Money

One Twitter user argues private blockchains are even inferior to SQL databases. Even non-developers agree on that point. There is no point in using a distributed ledger if there is no ensure recorded data is tamper-proof. So far, there has been no private distributed ledger able to provide immutability. None of these projects use a proof of work mechanism, which seems to be a must for keeping records safe from harm and tampering.

Keeping in mind how R3 received millions in funding, it shows up all of that money has been a waste. It is unclear what the money is spent on in the very first place, but it certainly isn’t blockchain technology. Telling they “don’t need” a blockchain is ridiculous for a blockchain-oriented project. It is unclear what will happen to R3 next. The entire project can be chalked up as a waste of time and effort, however.

Interestingly enough, this news only bodes well for bitcoin and normal blockchain technology. It is evident mimicking the bitcoin ecosystem can’t be done in a workable way. That is not a surprise either, yet some institutions will proceed to give it a attempt. Corda will be JVM based moving forward, which is the same as taking three steps backward. It is a shame to see so much money go to waste due to a project everyone knew would not succeed in the very first place.

Related video:

Qué es blockchain y cómo funciona?

¿Qué es blockchain y cómo funciona?

Share this post:

Los negocios pueden estar al borde de un cambio fundamental gracias a una nueva tecnología: blockchain. Blockchain es una tecnología que permite, a través de técnicas criptográficas, agilización de transacciones complejas.

La tecnología está basada en cuatro fundamentos: el registro compartido de las transacciones (ledger), el consenso para verificar las transacciones, un contrato que determina las reglas de funcionamiento de las transacciones y finalmente la criptografía, que es el fundamento de todo.

Una vez creada la crimson de negocios, se definen cuáles serán las transacciones y procesos que utilizará como base el blockchain. Aquí, destacamos algunos criterios básicos para ayudar en la clasificación de los procesos elegibles:

Procesos extremadamente complejos (y lentos) que mantengan una cadena de validación en varios niveles;

  • Transacciones que requieran trazabilidad;
  • Transacciones que exijan registros únicos y no alterables;
  • Procesos de identidad;
  • Necesidad de aumento (o establecimiento) de relación de confianza entre los miembros de la crimson de negocio;
  • Nuevos modelos de negocio.

Elegido el proceso, se incluye blockchain como una capa intermedia de transacciones entre la capa de systems of insight y la capa de estructura legada. Se programan en el blockchain el contrato (reglas de negocio aplicadas a los sistemas) que llamamos chaincodes. En esta programación también incluimos los niveles de acceso de los miembros de la crimson a la información contenida en el ledger.

A partir de ahí, todas las nuevas transacciones serán registradas y operadas de acuerdo con lo programado.

En el 2005, Linux Foundation creó el proyecto Hyperledger, con el objetivo de crear un estándar abierto cross-industry para el desarrollo de tecnologías utilizando blockchain. Son más de one hundred thirty miembros de distintas industrias, incluyendo IT, Finanzas, Salud y Transporte.

Este consorcio tiene la función de desarrollar proyectos de código abierto en torno a la tecnología blockchain. Uno de estos proyectos es el Hyperledger Fabric, que es la crimson blockchain corporativa utilizada por IBM para la implementación de soluciones de negocios con sus clientes.

Seguridad de blockchain en la nube

IBM utiliza Hyperledger Fabric en su solución segura de blockchain, High Security Business Network o HSBN. Esta solución se puede ejecutar tanto en bluemix como on-premise para habilitar sus proyectos de blockchain de forma segura e inmediata. Todos los datos transitados por la crimson y los sistemas se cifran, garantizando un nivel máximo de seguridad para proyectos de blockchain.

Las empresas pueden utilizar bluemix para colaborar y probar sus ideas, y desarrollar lo que se espera que sea una nueva generación de aplicaciones transaccionales basadas en el concepto de blockchain.

La crimson IBM Blockchain de alta seguridad está construida sobre una infraestructura que mantiene la crimson a salvo de amenazas internas y criminales cibernéticos. Esta infraestructura es IBM LinuxONE, un sistema Linux desarrollado y basado en la tecnología que integra la seguridad de hardware a través de contenedores seguros y un módulo de seguridad de hardware (HSM) que protege las claves de encriptación. Con incidentes de crimen cibernéticos cada vez mayores, este tipo de ambiente seguro es esencial para blockchain.

IBM z Systems está diseñado para blockchain

La plataforma z Systems es el centro de TI de la economía global, que sirve como sistema central para ninety two de los one hundred mejores bancos, twenty three de los twenty five principales minoristas y las ten principales aseguradoras del mundo. La plataforma IBM z Systems es conocida por su procesamiento de transacciones. La combinación de estos sistemas de procesamiento de transacciones líderes de la industria con blockchain proporciona a los clientes una integración empresarial entre blockchain y sus sistemas de registro. Permite a los clientes ampliar sus inversiones en plataformas corporativas esenciales para generar un valor más profundo en áreas como la gestión y análisis de fraudes y agilizar las interacciones reguladoras. Permite acelerar el time to value para las iniciativas empresariales y proporcionar una experiencia más rica al cliente.

Construido para la velocidad

Las grandes capacidades de crimson de memoria de la plataforma z Systems pueden acelerar la interacción entre el blockchain y sus datos empresariales existentes en procesos de CICS, IMS, TPF, DB2, VSAM, entre otros.

Construido para la seguridad

Una mayor seguridad y rendimiento son posibles cuando su plataforma admite tasas de codificación de transacciones de bloque superior. Generando firmas digitales o encriptación de hash para la cadena, z Systems utiliza aceleradores de cifrado que no son comunes en plataformas x86 para cloud públicas.

Construido para escalabilidad

El mainframe ofrece la disponibilidad y el rendimiento que sus transacciones de blockchain exigen. Con la capacidad de soportar hasta 8.000 máquinas virtuales con hasta ten TB de memoria y one hundred forty one núcleos de procesador dedicados, z Systems puede realizar las cargas de trabajo más pesadas y críticas – de forma rápida y segura.

Blockchain: ¡Un futuro emocionante!

Tiempos emocionantes están por delante de los negocios y el comercio. Como dice el proyecto Hyperledger, “Desde la web en sí, no hay tecnología que haya prometido una revolución más amplia y más fundamental que la tecnología blockchain”.

Obtenga más información sobre el potencial de blockchain y IBM z Systems ¡aquí!

Related video:

Protocol Labs – BlueYard Capital – Medium

Protocol Labs

The internet is one of the — if not the — most impactful and significant technology in the history of humanity. The internet gives us superpowers we could not have imagined prior to its existence: we can connect to half of the planet, at any time and from almost anywhere; we can access the most finish compendium of human skill in seconds; we can solve difficult problems across former boundaries; we can work, play, and be together at a distance; we can conjure systems of digital and mechanical agents to do work for us. Thanks to the internet, we can switch the world, we can save lives, and we can wield all the powers of our species — for good and bad — with a sequence of keystrokes. And surely, this is only the beginning.

However, the internet has become increasingly centralized and vulnerable. Our current system of servers and clients strung together by http strings has enabled the creation of vast data monopolies and the capability to mute voices of organizations and individuals. It’s a fragile system that is frequently under attack. In brief: if we want the internet to proceed to thrive and proceed to enable permissionless innovation and freedom, then the protocol stack of the internet needs upgrading, from the protocol layer up. Inject Protocol Labs, a research, development, and deployment lab for entirely fresh network protocols aiming to upgrade the internet. Read all about their mission here.

Protocol Labs are the makers of the Interplanetary File System (IPFS) . If that sounds familiar, it is because you may have seen the race to secure US climate data on IPFS shortly after Trump came to office, or more recently you may have seen IPFS being used to bring Wikipedia back online in Turkey. IPFS has also already seen widespread adoption in the decentralized space and has become a key protocol for that ecosystem. Since the creation of IPFS, the team has gone on to create a larger ecosystem of interrelated protocols, projects and products that all have much to do with decentralized data distribution:

  • The InterPlanetary File System (IPFS) is a fresh protocol to decentralize the web. IPFS enables the creation of entirely decentralized and distributed applications, using content addressing and digital signatures. IPFS makes the web swifter, safer, and more open.
  • Filecoin is a cryptocurrency-powered storage network. Miners earn Filecoin by providing open hard-drive space to the network, while users spend Filecoin to store their files encrypted in the decentralized network.
  • libp2p is a modular networking stack. libp2p brings together a multiplicity of transports and peer-to-peer protocols, making it effortless for developers to build large, sturdy p2p networks.
  • IPLD is the data model for the Decentralized Web. It connects all data through cryptographic hashes, and makes it effortless to traverse and link to.
  • The Multiformats Project is a collection of protocols to future-proof systems, today. Self-describing formats make your systems interoperable and upgradable.
  • CoinList is a protocol token fundraising platform. AngelList meets Kickstarter meets Protocol Tokens.
  • SAFT is a legal framework for protocol token fundraising.

Not only is Protocol Labs creating a next generation web protocol stack; it is also a fresh kind of company: part Silicon Valley startup, part decentralized tribe, with a large open source footprint. It is more akin to a movement. We think that is what you’ll need to switch the foundations of something at internet scale.

Protocol Labs is going to capture value from its work through holding market protocol assets. A market protocol is a system that mediates some economic activity, and lodges value exchanges using a cryptographic asset. This structure solves economic problems in asymmetric peer-to-peer resource sharing, scaling, services, maintenance, and development. Filecoin is going to be the very first market protocol asset to be released, and we’ll be able to talk more about Filecoin and our involvement in the token sale shortly.

There are now increasingly high stakes — both economically and as a society — to avoid a web that is increasingly centralized and vulnerable. Protocol Labs’ fresh protocols provide a way to re-architect the web back to being decentralized and less vulnerable. Our bet is elementary: that IPFS and its other protocols can become a fundamental building block of a better version of the internet.

We’re backing Protocol Labs together with Union Square Ventures, Y Combinator, Naval Ravikant, and a few other folks we are very glad to be working with.

Related video:

1 2 3 4 5 8